If you want to continue using the old site, you still can here.
  • Favorites
  • Print
  • Rate Me

preaching article Why Successful Churches Aren’t Turning the World Upside-Down – But the Outcasts Might

Why Successful Churches Aren’t Turning the World Upside-Down – But the Outcasts Might

based on 2 ratings
Oct 14, 2016
Scripture: none
(Suggest Scripture)


Jesus was the most culture-challenging, paradigm-shifting, tradition-breaking, change agent who ever lived.

How did his followers become so boring?

Want cutting-edge, society-shifting change? Church is the last place people expect to find it.

Want dry, stuffy, moldy, old traditions and ideas? That may be the very definition of church in many people’s minds.

This is a problem. A big problem. And it’s our fault. We’ve taken the life- and society-transforming message of Jesus and we’ve made it about . . . success.

Trying to maintain that success has made us safe.

Safe is boring.

A Successful Church Is Not Enough

When I look around the church leadership world today, I see a lot of very good, very nice people. People who love Jesus and are doing whatever they can to make a difference. And many of them are making a difference – a much bigger difference than me, that’s for sure.

They fill up churches and even stadiums. They lead people to Jesus. And nothing – absolutely nothing – will ever be more important than that.

But is it wrong for me to feel like there’s something missing?

For example, can you name any Christian leader who has had a recognizable impact on the culture since Martin Luther King Jr. marched on Washington over 50 years ago? Anyone who inspires anything like the passion King inspires in the hearts of the average person – churchgoer, or not?

Where Are The World-Changing Leaders?

Where are the church leaders who will take up the mantle of, not just successful ministry, but life- and society-transformation?

I’m not talking about name recognition. I’m talking about leaders with such a radically positive approach to the life and message of Jesus that they have a society-shifting impact.

Where are the Christian innovators who will put a dangerous passion for Jesus ahead of personal ministry success?

I’m not upset at anyone. I just want more.

I pray for an infusion of Godly change agents who won’t just transform the institutional church, but make the world stand up and take notice. Or, more likely, change the world and leave the institutional church playing catch-up.

That won’t happen by screaming on Facebook about whatever sin happens to be trending this week. That’s been done. That’s being done. The world yawns at the self-proclaimed faith-defenders – if they even care enough to be bored by them.

When MLK opposed the sin of racism, it wasn’t because he was chasing the headlines of the day. He shone a spotlight on it so powerfully that he made it the headline of the day.

He didn’t chase the issues, he framed the issues. He didn’t pursue crowds, he made the crowds come to him. And the culture followed. Just like Jesus did 2,000 years before him.

Would We Know a Real Jesus Movement If We Saw It?

I pray for a new breed of Christian leaders who will change the world. People who make such a positive, Jesus-led impact on the ills of society that entire cultures can’t help but stand up and pay attention.

Where are the church leaders who will at least try to do

  • What Martin Luther did for faith
  • What Charles Dickens did for literature
  • What Pablo Picasso did for art
  • What Albert Einstein did for science
  • What Jackie Robinson did for sports and culture
  • What the Beatles did for music
  • What Martin Luther King Jr did for race relations
  • What a bunch of nerds in Silicon Valley and Seattle did for technology?

What did all those paradigm-shifters have in common? They were all outcasts before they became heroes. They were artists, innovators and outside-the-box thinkers and doers. Like I wrote in a previous post, the church needs artists and prophets more than we need managers right now.

The church needs artists and prophets more than we need managers.

That kind of life- and society transforming impact can happen through the church again. But I fear we’ve created such a success-based Christian culture that we won’t just miss it, we’re likely to preach sermons and write blog posts denouncing it.

How is a hurting world going to find healing inside the doors of a church whose leaders are obsessed with asking questions like “how will we measure the success of our latest venture?” and “how will this play to our biggest donors?”

The Jesus-following leaders who answer this call will need to be okay with ticking a lot of people off. Even – maybe especially – church people. Not because they’re trying to offend people. But because they’re so passionate about doing the Jesus stuff, they might not even notice that the cool kids are getting upset by it.

The Church Needs More Nerds and Weirdos

One of the reasons I’m such a supporter of small churches is because, as I wrote in The Grasshopper Myth, real world transformation doesn’t happen from the top-down. Those who are succeeding don’t have a reason to change things.

Any real-life, world-changing, spirit-infused, culture-shaping, paradigm-shifting, hurt-healing movement will come where it’s always come from. From the bottom-up. From the disenfranchised. From the nerds and weirdos.

True visionaries and world-changers don’t call themselves that in their Twitter profiles (beware of those who do). So they’re not easy to spot. In fact, they’re likely to deny they are either of those things. They just get busy doing those things.

Since foundation-shakers won’t pre-announce themselves, I’m keeping my eyes and ears on small, quirky churches and fringe ministries because I want to recognize the next church- and world leaders when they start doing their work. Then I want to be a Caleb to the church’s next Joshuas. A Barnabas for our future Apostle Pauls.

I pray for leaders who have such an unquenchable passion for Jesus and love for hurting people that they don’t care how many establishment Christians they alienate.

And I look forward to the day when they build their own (probably electronic) soapboxes to blast that message of transformative hope to the world.

I just pray that it happens in my lifetime. Because I want to cheer them on.

 

Karl Vaters is the author of The Grasshopper Myth: Big Churches, Small Churches and the Small Thinking That Divides Us. He’s been in pastoral ministry for over 30 years and has been the lead pastor of Cornerstone Christian Fellowship in Fountain Valley, California for over 20 years. He’s also the founder of NewSmallChurch.com, a blog that encourages, connects and equips innovative Small Church pastors.

Talk about it...

Rev Debbie Gillispie avatar
Rev Debbie Gillispie
0 days ago
Thank you!
Stephen Belokur avatar
Stephen Belokur
0 days ago
(Please forgive the following broad generalizations.) Kingdom building for the sake of Jesus has been replaced in America by the church growth "industry". We have taken our eyes off Jesus. Jesus never intended to change societies, His goal was to change one heart at at time. Trying to change culture without changing hearts is treating the symptom and not the disease. Changed hearts will change society but never with societal change as the goal but only as the byproduct of hearts sold out to Jesus.
Steve Darnall avatar
Steve Darnall
0 days ago
I know God keeps order, but sometimes His order looks like beautiful chaos. I just got back from a church service that may seem disorderly, people kneeling crying out for God's holiness in their lives, extended times of thanksgiving and worship, and multiple ways of reaching out to the community's felt needs. Their buildings are old and simple and 75 of their congregation is 18-40. They expect God's presence in their lives (living by the Spirit) to lead to bearing the fruit of Spirit. And living such lives leads others to Christ which is changing our area and the areas God moves them to. It is not complicated, they are just uninterested in comfort and prestige and very interested in being and making disciples of Jesus Christ and building a community of God's forgiven and forgiving. May not have great eloquent speakers -- in fact their meetings presentations are much more interactive than traditional sermons, they are not quite as large as our more traditional church... but not by much and they are growing; so I expect they will soon pass us as the largest evangelical church in our area. Just hope this does not ruin them.
Abraham J. Meintjes avatar
Abraham J. Meintjes
0 days ago
This topic is humbly considered as very important. Church does NOT work well at this moment! I share this perception from more than 50 years of being a Churchian, well versed in various Denominational dialects of Christianese and with 22 years of missions experience as far as isolated villages along the length of the Congo River. Church members are not being facilitated to grow and Go!. Comfort, cozy, secure and aloof are the mottos of modern luke-warm Christianity. There are Matthew 24:14 barriers in local society and at the ends of the earth that remain in position still unchallenged by the Full Gospel of fellowship, worship AND fruit-bearing action. Areas bound by currrently unsurpassed spiritual strongholds. Christians and Pastors argue about venues, service routines, tattoos, fellowship meals, dynamic and entertaining speakers, equipment, building maintenance and rivalry with the church next door. The Kingdom cannot come near, - I submit, - because the salt, light and Kingdom yeast had waned, tarried and excelled at the Great Omission. So many proclaim a longing for "Jesus' soon return" ... to what? We have to pray for serious revival, reformation, transformation and restoration in and through the Church, - and act upon it!

So, what did you think?


Thank you.